Sunday Poem ~

The First Snowfall

James Russell Lowell, 18191891

The snow had begun in the gloaming,
   And busily all the night
Had been heaping field and highway
   With a silence deep and white.
   
Every pine and fir and hemlock
   Wore ermine too dear for an earl,
And the poorest twig on the elm-tree
   Was ridged inch deep with pearl.

From sheds new-roofed with Carrara
   Came Chanticleer’s muffled crow,
The stiff rails were softened to swan’s-down,
   And still fluttered down the snow.

I stood and watched by the window
   The noiseless work of the sky,
And the sudden flurries of snow-birds,
   Like brown leaves whirling by.

I thought of a mound in sweet Auburn
   Where a little headstone stood;
How the flakes were folding it gently,
   As did robins the babes in the wood.
   
Up spoke our own little Mabel,
   Saying, “Father, who makes it snow?”
And I told of the good All-father
   Who cares for us here below.
   
Again I looked at the snow-fall,
   And thought of the leaden sky
That arched o’er our first great sorrow,
   When that mound was heaped so high.
   
I remembered the gradual patience
   That fell from that cloud-like snow,
Flake by flake, healing and hiding
   The scar of our deep-plunged woe.
   
And again to the child I whispered,
   “The snow that husheth all,
Darling, the merciful Father
   Alone can make it fall!”
   
Then, with eyes that saw not, I kissed her;
   And she, kissing back, could not know
That my kiss was given to her sister,
   Folded close under deepening snow.

This poem is in the public domain.

https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/first-snowfall

James Russell Lowell

James Russell Lowell was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on February 22, 1819, the son of the Reverend Charles Lowell and Harriet Spence. He attended William Wells School and Harvard University, where he graduated with a degree in law. However, Lowell had no interest in pursuing a career in that field. Shortly after graduating from Harvard, in 1841, he published his first collection of poems, A Year’s Life (C. C. Little and J. Brown), inspired by the poet Maria White, whom he would marry three years later.

Living Life to the Best of Your Possibility
‘One can judge a nation by the way it treats  its most vulnerable’ ~ Aristotle
Victoria Kaloss

Sunday Poem~

Winter

And the robin flew
Into the air, the air,
The white mist through;
And small and rare
The night-frost fell
Into the calm and misty dell.

And the dusk gathered low,
And the silver moon and stars
On the frozen snow
Drew taper bars,
Kindled winking fires
In the hooded briers.

And the sprawling Bear
Growled deep in the sky;
And Orion’s hair
Streamed sparkling by:
But the North sighed low,
“Snow, snow, more snow!”

from Poems (1906) Hazell, Watson and Viney, LD. This poem is in the public domain.

Walter de la Mare

Walter de la Mare was born on April 25, 1873 in London.

(I think I’m falling in love with Walter de la Mare)  😉
Living Life to the Best of Your Possibility
‘One can judge a  nation by the way it treats its most vulnerable’ ~ Aristotle
Victoria Kaloss

Sunday Poem~

Hermes of the Ways

H. D.

 

About This Poem

“Hermes of the Ways” was published in Vol. 1, No. 5 of Des Imagistes in February of 1914.

Hilda Doolittle was born on September 10, 1886, in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Her collections of poetry include Sea Garden (Constable and Company, Ltd, 1916) and Helen in Egypt (New Directions, 1961). She died on September 27, 1961.

 

Photo credit: Perdita Schaffner/New Directions

more-at-poets

Sunday Poem ~

Sunsets, on the top three favorite things list 🙂

 

Sunset

E. E. Cummings

 

Living Life to the Best of Your Possibility

‘One can judge a nation by the way it treats its most vulnerable’ ~ Aristotle

Victoria Kaloss

 

Sunday Poem~

In the Mountains on a Summer Day

by Li Po

https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/mountains-summer-day?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Academy%20of%20American%20Poets%20Newsletter%20August%2023&utm_content=Academy%20of%20American%20Poets%20Newsletter%20August%2023+CID_c335a83ad626dcd056da786684000065&utm_source=Email%20marketing%20software&utm_term=In%20the%20Mountains%20on%20a%20Summer%20Day

Our poet is in the mountains but I was at the beach 😉

barefoot on the beach (1024x768) (2).jpg

Photography credit : Victoria Kaloss

Thank you, Summer – see you next year!

 

Living Life to the Best of Your Possibility

‘One can judge a nation by the way it treats its most vulnerable’ ~ Aristole

Victoria Kaloss

Sunday Poem ~ (also author of ‘Jungle Book’)

The Power of the Dog

Rudyard Kipling, 18651936

There is sorrow enough in the natural way
From men and women to fill our day;
And when we are certain of sorrow in store,
Why do we always arrange for more?
Brothers and Sisters, I bid you beware
Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
 
Buy a pup and your money will buy
Love unflinching that cannot lie—
Perfect passion and worship fed
By a kick in the ribs or a pat on the head.
Nevertheless it is hardly fair
To risk your heart for a dog to tear.
 
When the fourteen years which Nature permits
Are closing in asthma, or tumour, or fits,
And the vet’s unspoken prescription runs
To lethal chambers or loaded guns,
Then you will find—it’s your own affair—
But … you’ve given your heart to a dog to tear.
 
When the body that lived at your single will,
With its whimper of welcome, is stilled (how still!).
When the spirit that answered your every mood
Is gone—wherever it goes—for good,
You will discover how much you care,
And will give your heart to a dog to tear.
 
We’ve sorrow enough in the natural way,
When it comes to burying Christian clay.
Our loves are not given, but only lent,
At compound interest of cent per cent.
Though it is not always the case, I believe,
That the longer we’ve kept ’em, the more do we grieve:
For, when debts are payable, right or wrong,
A short-time loan is as bad as a long—
So why in—Heaven (before we are there)
Should we give our hearts to a dog to tear?

This poem is in the public domain.

Rudyard Kipling

Joseph Rudyard Kipling is best known for his novels The Jungle Book, The Second Jungle Book, and Kim, and his most famous poem, “If“.

Living Life to the Best of Your Possibility
‘One can judge a nation by the way it treats its most vulnerable’ ~Aristotle
Victoria Kaloss